History of Two-Up

Anzac Cookies, AC/DC + Two Pennies

Australia may be a young country, but it’s rich in culture and tradition – a nostalgic nod to the simple things in life and the commemoration of mateship during harder times.

This is never clearer than on ANZAC Day – known as the nation’s day of remembrance, where friends and family gather early in the morning to pay respect to the men and women who’ve served their country.

This is the day where the game two-up is legally allowed to be played – hotel pubs and bars across the country will clear some space in the room, and slowly but surely the excited sound of cheers and anticipation fills the air, someone will yell “Come in spinner!” and the clink of two pennies hitting the ground becomes a familiar sound of the day.

Thought to have originated from a game called Pitch & Toss (played with a single coin), two-up was played among the poorer English and Irish citizens in the 18th century, brought over by immigrants and convicts – spreading in popularity throughout the goldfields in the eastern colonies by the 1850’s. The game was played extensively by Australian soldiers during WWI and WWII from which came the tradition of it being played on Anzac Day.

Two-up famously was legalised in NSW and Victoria in the 1990’s, primarily being played in RSL’s and pubs on commemorative days such as Anzac Day. Queensland only legalised the game in 2012.

 The Morrison will be hosting two-up at its annual Anzac Day event on Tuesday 25th April – with doors opening from 8am, get in on the two-up action, a spin of the kip and good times all round!

Set to be a great day with a special Aussie themed menu, draught beer and classic Aussie rock – be sure to drop in and say hi! With a performance by the LLC Southern Cross pipe band, live DJ and a display of military vehicles for charity, there’ll be no shortage of fun to be had by all.

225 George Street
Cnr of George & Grosvenor